(FAQ) Herbs (H)

Common herbs and spices

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Hawthorn

Hawthorn Herbs for Pets

Scientific: Crataegus laevigata [WikiPedia]

Appearance: Crataegus is a thorny shrub or tree with stems and trunks that consist of hard wood and grey bark, often having tri-lobed leaves and white flowers that are similar to other genera in the Rosaceae or Rose family and bearing bright red berries. There are around 280 known species, several of which are used in traditional medicine and may be used interchangeably.

Parts Used: Dried leaf and flower as a tea or capsule; fresh or dried as a tincture. Dried berry as a tincture, tea, or encapsulated; can also be made into smoothies, punches, cordials or even made into a fresh juice.

Common Uses: Hawthorn has been used since the Middle ages, with some accounts going back as far as the first century to Greek herbalist Dioscorides. It was later used by Swiss physician Paracelsus (1493–1541 CE). Considered to be a particularly symbolic tree with many folk-tales and magical myths surrounding it, hawthorn was "sacred tree medicine" to the ancient Druids, and was said to house fairies, specifically when growing with oak and ash trees. Hawthorn is widely regarded in Europe as a safe and effective treatment for the early stages of heart disease and is endorsed by Commission E- the branch of the German government that studies and approves herbal treatments. It is used to promote the health of the circulatory system and has been found useful in treating angina, high blood pressure, congestive heart failure and cardiac arrhythmia. It has been found to strengthen the heart and stabilise it against arrythmias. Hawthorn leaf, flower, and berry have been praised over the centuries for their heart elevating properties. Believed to uplift and strengthen both the physical and emotional heart, hawthorn, as it supports healthy cardiovascular function, was also revered for ceremonial and spiritual purposes. The flavourful red berries have been used in candies, jams, jellies, wines, and cordials and are widely available in many forms as dietary supplements.

  • Increase overall energy in the cardiovascular system
  • Tone the muscle of the heart and promote health
  • Regulate blood pressure within a normal range
  • Maintain a regular heartbeat
  • Restore heart muscles that have weakened, treat inflammation in the heart, and prevent arteriosclerosis (build-up of plaque that restricts blood flow)

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PLEASE NOTE that herbal and other natural products can harm your animals – not all plants are safe and gentle! Do not attempt using any of the ingredients listed, or any other plant matter, without the guidance of a qualified herbalist.

Hemp

Hemp Herbs for Pets

Scientific: Cannabis sativa [WikiPedia]

Appearance: Hemp is from the Cannabis genus. Its seeds, oil and nuts are amazing dietary and cosmetic substances. China is the largest producer of hemp. There are a wide range of benefits to using hemp products. Hemp seeds, nuts and oil are unlike any other food on earth. Hemp contains the 9 essential amino acids required for good health.

Parts Used: Seed and Leaf.

Common Uses: Hemp has a bad reputation as being an illegal narcotic, which deters many people from the hemp plant, Cannabis sativa. However, the plant's Latin name means "useful hemp", and the seeds are one of the most nutritious substances on earth. Hemp seed contains all the essential amino acids and essential fatty acids that our bodies need, which makes it a perfect protein supplement. No other single source provides such a complete protein in a form that is so easily digested and absorbed by the body. Hemp is highly nutritious, and retains the necessary fatty acid proportion required for humans. It is a great dietary supplement in any form. It does not contain whey or lactose, and is a fantastic substitute food for people who have nut allergies. Vegetarians and vegans can supplement their diet with protein rich hemp. Hemp can assist with several medical conditions and has many health benefits. Hemp seed oil helps to remedy several medical conditions including acne, psoriasis, osteoporosis, cancer and multiple sclerosis. It acts as an anti-inflammatory and anti-ageing agent. It balances dry skin, heals skin lesions, and contains anti-oxidants and moisture balancing properties. Hemp seed oil prevents moisture loss on a physiological level. Most oils only coat the top layer of the skin, but hemp oil provides deep moisturisation. The balance of linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid in hemp seed oil can satisfy our needs for these essential fatty acids (EFAs) very well. Both the complete protein and the essential oils contained in hemp seeds are in ideal ratios for human nutrition.

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PLEASE NOTE that herbal and other natural products can harm your animals – not all plants are safe and gentle! Do not attempt using any of the ingredients listed, or any other plant matter, without the guidance of a qualified herbalist.

Horehound

Horehound Herbs for Pets

Scientific: Marrubium vulgare [WikiPedia]

Appearance: Horehound is a garden mint with green and white leaves and a distinctively bitter taste. It is native to Asia and Europe, but is naturalized in North America. Although the herb grows in a wide range of climates, the best quality is grown in desert heat. Egyptian priests referred to it as the "Seed of Horus", which some speculate its modern name came from. In medieval Europe it was used to ward off spells by witches. It is also recorded as one of the "bitter herbs" eaten at Passover.

Parts Used: The above-ground parts of the plant, dried and cut.

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PLEASE NOTE that herbal and other natural products can harm your animals – not all plants are safe and gentle! Do not attempt using any of the ingredients listed, or any other plant matter, without the guidance of a qualified herbalist.

Horsetail

Horsetail Herbs for Pets

Scientific: Equisetum spp. [WikiPedia]

Appearance: Horsetail has a recorded history going back to the Devonian period, almost 350 million years ago. The plant at that time was as tall as a modern palm tree. Horsetail, not to be confused with cat-tail, is possibly the most abundant source of silica in the plant kingdom, so much in fact that the herb can be used for polishing metal. It got the name "scouring rush" from this very application. It has had other uses during the ages including as an ingredient in shampoos, skincare products, and in dietary supplements.

Parts Used: The above-ground parts of the plant, dried, cut, and powdered.

Common Uses: Horsetail is an astringent herb and has a diuretic action. It has an affinity for the urinary tract where it can be used to sooth inflammation, haemorrhaging, cystic ulceration, ulcers, cystitis and to treat infections. It is considered a specific remedy in cases of inflammation or benign enlargement of the prostate gland and is also used to quicken the removal of kidney stones. Its toning and astringent action make it of value in the treatment of incontinence and bed-wetting in children. It may be applied to such conditions as urethritis or cystitis with haematuria, reducing haemorrhage and healing wounds thanks to the high silica content. This local astringent and anti-haemorrhagic effect explains the application of horsetail to such conditions as bleeding from the mouth, nose and vagina, its use to check diarrhoea, dysentery and bleeding from the bowel, and for slow-healing wounds, chilblains and conjunctivitis.

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PLEASE NOTE that herbal and other natural products can harm your animals – not all plants are safe and gentle! Do not attempt using any of the ingredients listed, or any other plant matter, without the guidance of a qualified herbalist.

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Disclaimer

If you are feeding herbs for healing or calming purposes then it is most effective to feed the herbs on a daily basis throughout one full blood cycle, which is 3 months (12 weeks). The condition should be vastly improved over this time to the point where further supplementation should no longer be necessary.

Please ensure that you are familiar with our [medical disclaimer]. We provide these herbal solutions for your convenience only, and because we know they work for the conditions that these solutions have been formulated for.

Herbs as a rule should not be fed to pregnant animals, as many of them have uterine or hormonal stimulant properties. Before feeding a herb to a broodmare or foal, please consult with a [vet or holistic animal practitioner] to substantiate safety of a specific herb. The information provided by us on this site is intended solely for animals older than six months of age.